June 8, 2018

Daring Dreamers Club #1: Milla Takes Charge by Erin Soderberg

Title: Milla Takes Charge, Daring Dreamers Club #1
Author: Erin Soderberg
Copy Obtained: From publisher for an honest review

Milla loves nothing more than imagining grand adventures in the great wide somewhere, just like Belle. She dreams of traveling the world and writing about her incredible discoveries. Unfortunately, there is nothing pretend about the fifth-grade overnight and Milla's fear that her moms won't let her go.

Enter Piper, Mariana, Zahra, and Ruby. Together with Milla, they form the Daring Dreamers Club and become best friends. But can they help Milla believe she's ready for this real grand adventure?

Diverse, talented, and smart--these five girls found each other because they all had one thing in common: big dreams. 


When I was offered this book for review I jumped at the chance.  I'm always looking for new series to add to the library or suggest to my readers.  And I loved the idea that this one contained an array of diverse characters that are pursuing their dreams.

What I like about this book is that if the reader doesn't relate to Milla the main character, there are several other characters they could connect with.  I love that! I'm wondering in future books if the narrator will shift to some of the other girls.  I also love that it shows girls supporting one another in their dreams.  It's such a great example of how we can do that in our own lives.  I've seen examples of that in other books but usually only between two friends, so it was nice to see a whole group supporting and helping each other.  

I really liked Milla.  She is so kind and thoughtful, but not to the point of being annoying.  I think the girls reading this will really like her too.  They'll wish they had a friend like her.  I also loved how her moms were shown in the story.  It was so matter-of-fact, and that was great.  I think kids now see it that way too a lot of times so they wouldn't need a big deal made of it.  

As for the story itself - nicely done.  As an adult, it was kind of simplified, but for the age group it's geared toward it was fine.  They'll relate and definitely be pulled in.  And in the end I think they'll want to learn more about the girls in the Daring Dreamers Club.

Final thought:  Great start to a new series for the tween set.
Library Thoughts: For an elementary with 3-5th graders for sure.  It's probably best for grades 3 and 4.  

June 5, 2018

Blog Tour: God Bless American: The Story of an Immigrant Named Irving Berlin by Adah Nuchi +GIVEAWAY

I'm always on the lookout for picture books I can recommend to the teachers I work with.  So when RockStar Tours asked for help promoting God Bless America, I knew I had to help! 


This is a book I know my social studies teachers will love!


About the Book

Title: GOD BLESS AMERICA: THE STORY OF AN IMMIGRANT NAMED IRVING BERLIN
Author: Adah Nuchi, Rob Polivka (Illustrations)
Pub. Date: June 5, 2018
Publisher: Disney-Hyperion
Formats: Hardcover, eBook
Pages: 40
Find it: GoodreadsAmazonB&NiBooks,  TBD

An inspiring portrait of an immigrant and the gift he gave his new home.

Persecuted as Jews, Izzy Baline and his family emigrated from Russia to New York, where he fell in love with his new country. He heard music everywhere and was full to bursting with his own. Izzy's thump-two-three, ting-a-ling, whee tunes soon brought him acclaim as the sought-after songwriter Irving Berlin. He ignited the imaginations of fellow countrymen and women with his Broadway and Hollywood numbers, crafting tunes that have become classics we still sing today.

But when darker times came and the nation went to war, it was time for Irving to compose a new kind of song:

A boom-rah-rah song.

A big brass belter.

A loud heart-melter.

A song for America.

And so "God Bless America" was born, the heart swelling standard that Americans have returned to again and again after its 1918 composition.

This is the tale of how a former refugee gave America one of its most celebrated patriotic songs. With stirring, rhythmic text by Adah Nuchi and delightful, energetic art by Rob Polivka, readers will be ready to hum along to this exuberant picture book.

About Adah:
Adah Megged Nuchi was first introduced to the children's publishing world at home, as the daughter of a children's book art director. She began her own publishing career at the National Book Foundation, and later at Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Books for Young Readers, where she was an acquiring editor of picture books, middle-grade, and young adult fiction for seven years. Her books have been named to the Kids' Indie Next List, YALSA Best Books for Young Adults, and Indies Introduce New Voices lists. As an editor, she most loved finding new talent and working with authors to shape a story.     Twitter

Giveaway Details:
3 winners will receive a finished copy of GOD BLESS AMERICA: THE STORY OF AN IMMIGRANT NAMED IRVING BERLIN, US Only.




Check out the rest of the tour stops!

Week One:
6/4/2018- RhythmicBooktrovertExcerpt
6/5/2018- The OWLReview
6/6/2018- Christen KrummReview
6/7/2018- BookHounds YAGuest Post
6/8/2018- Book-KeepingReview

Week Two:
6/11/2018- Savings in SecondsReview
6/12/2018- Little Red Reads- Review
6/13/2018- Reading Is My SuperPowerReview
6/14/2018- Two points of interestReview
6/15/2018- A Dream Within A DreamExcerpt

June 3, 2018

Review: Just Under the Clouds by Melissa Sarno

Title: Just Under the Clouds
Author: Melissa Sarno
Copy Obtained: From publisher for an honest review

Always think in threes and you'll never fall, Cora's father told her when she was a little girl. Two feet, one hand. Two hands, one foot. That was all Cora needed to know to climb the trees of Brooklyn.

But now Cora is a middle schooler, a big sister, and homeless. Her mother is trying to hold the family together after her father's death, and Cora must look after her sister, Adare, who's just different, their mother insists. Quick to smile, Adare hates wearing shoes, rarely speaks, and appears untroubled by the question Cora can't help but ask: How will she find a place to call home?

After their room at the shelter is ransacked, Cora's mother looks to an old friend for help, and Cora finally finds what she has been looking for: Ailanthus altissima, the "tree of heaven," which can grow in even the worst conditions. It sets her on a path to discover a deeper truth about where she really belongs.


This is the second book about being homeless that I've read recently.  That book (Crenshaw) dealt more with a family that was on the verge of becoming homeless while this book focuses on a family that is already homeless.  Although being homeless is not the only thing this book looks at.  Cora is still dealing with the loss of her father, and she has her sister to worry about.  It's a lot for a young girl.  So when she's put in a situation where she can make a friend, she doesn't trust it.  I think that part of the book made me the saddest.  I've kids like that while teaching.  You can tell they've been bounced around so much that they don't even bother to try to connect to the people around them.  I wanted to tell Cora that it would be ok, and she could make a friend but honestly, with situation her family is in, it was clearly possible they would move again.  It saddened me.  

That said - I think this would be a good book for middle school students.  I live in an area with very little homelessness, at least in the traditional sense.  I believe we have homeless students at my school, but they don't live in a shelter or in their car.  They might live with others instead.  And that is what ends up happening in this book, so I think it would be a great example to show my students what homelessness can look like.  It doesn't mean you leave on the street.  There are other types.  And I think kids, where I live, need to see that and understand that.  I've always believed that books should show students what they know so they know they aren't alone BUT they should always show students what they don't know so they learn how to empathize.  Thankfully Cora is a great character that I think will really draw the reader in and allow this to happen. 

Final thoughts: Great story with strong characters that grow and change.  
Library thoughts: For sure I would put this in my library for the reasons I discussed above!  

May 31, 2018

Review: Grump: The (Fairly) True Tale of Snow White and the Seven Dwarves by Liesl Shurtliff

Title: Grump: The (Fairly) True Tale of Snow White and the Seven Dwarves
Author: Liesl Shurtliff
Copy Obtained: From publisher for an honest review

Ever since he was a dwarfling, Borlen (nicknamed "Grump") has dreamed of visiting The Surface, so when opportunity knocks, he leaves his cavern home behind.

At first, life aboveground is a dream come true. Queen Elfrieda Veronika Ingrid Lenore (E.V.I.L.) is the best friend Grump always wanted, feeding him all the rubies he can eat and allowing him to rule at her side in exchange for magic and information. But as time goes on, Grump starts to suspect that Queen E.V.I.L. may not be as nice as she seems. . . .

When the queen commands him to carry out a horrible task against her stepdaughter Snow White, Grump is in over his head. He's bound by magic to help the queen, but also to protect Snow White. As if that wasn't stressful enough, the queen keeps bugging him for updates through her magic mirror! He'll have to dig deep to find a way out of this pickle, and that's enough to make any dwarf Grumpy indeed.


Ok so I've never read a book by this author before even though I have them in my media center.  I will now be recommending them a lot! This book was just fun and cute and everything that is an enjoyable middle-grade read.  

I'm not always one for a retelling of fairy tales.  So I was a bit hesitant, but it was so cute.  I really like stories where a character is different from the whole group.  Grump doesn't completely fit in with the other dwarves because he doesn't feel as comfortable in the deep underground.  This sets off a whole series of events that puts in into the middle of the Snow White story.  It kinda reminded me of the Lion King movie that shows the story of Pumba and Timon - where you get to see the other side of the story.  I think kids will get a kick out of that, and even better than can read more by this author. 

The story itself was well done.  It had the right amount of tension and pacing.  It didn't seem to drag which is very important when it comes to middle-grade books.  I pretty much zipped through it.  And pulling it along - Grump.  Loved that character.  It was flawed and determined and wanted to do what was right.  Great character!

Final thought: Great little book that I will be pointing out to many students now!
Library Thoughts: For sure I'll be adding it to the collection  

May 30, 2018

Smoke and Iron by Rachel Caine Excerpt and Giveaway!



Do you love the Ink and Bone series by Rachel Caine? Would you like a chance at a great giveaway? 

Want to read an excerpt? 

I've got stuff for you!


Smoke and Iron comes out in July

To save the Great Library, the unforgettable characters from Ink and Bone, Paper and Fire, and Ash and Quill put themselves in danger in the next thrilling adventure in the New York Times bestselling series.


The opening moves of a deadly game have begun. Jess Brightwell has put himself in direct peril, with only his wits and skill to aid him in a game of cat and mouse with the Archivist Magister of the Great Library. With the world catching fire, and words printed on paper the spark that lights rebellion, it falls to smugglers, thieves, and scholars to save a library thousands of years in the making...if they can stay alive long enough to outwit their enemies.

First I've got an excerpt from Smoke and Iron!  Read below!


SMOKE AND IRON by Rachel Caine
It had all started as an exercise to fight the unending boredom of being locked in this Alexandrian prison cell.

When Jess Brightwell woke up, he realized that he’d lost track of time. Days blurred here, and he knew it was important to remember how long he’d been trapped, waiting for the axe to fall—or not. So he diligently scratched out a record on the wall using a button from his shirt.

Five days. Five days since he’d arrived back in Alexandria, bringing with him Scholar Wolfe and Morgan Hault as his prisoners. They’d been taken off in different directions, and he’d been dumped here to—as they’d said—await the Archivist’s pleasure.

The Archivist, it seemed, was a very busy man.

Once Jess had the days logged, he did the mental exercise of calculating the date, from pure boredom. It took him long, uneasy moments to realize why that date—today—seemed important.

And then he remembered and was ashamed it had taken him so long.

Today was the anniversary of his brother Liam’s death. His elder brother.

And today meant that Jess was now older than Liam had ever lived to be.

He couldn’t remember exactly how Liam had died. Could hardly remember his brother at all these days, other than a vague impression of a sharp nose and shaggy blondish hair. He must have watched Liam walk up the stairs of the scaffold and stand as the rope was fixed around his neck.

But he couldn’t remember that, or watching the drop. Just Liam, hanging. It seemed like a painting viewed at a distance, not a memory.

Wish I could remember, he thought. If Liam had held his head high on the way to his death, if he’d gone up the steps firmly and stood without fear, then maybe Jess would be able to do it, too. Because that was likely to be in his future.

He closed his eyes and tried to picture it: the cell door opening. Soldiers in High Garda uniforms, the army of the Great Library, waiting stone-faced in the hall. A Scholar to read the text of his choice to him on the way to execution. Perhaps a priest, if he asked for one.
But there, his mind went blank. He didn’t know how the Archivist would end his life. Would it be a quiet death? Private? A shot in the back? Burial without a marker? Maybe nobody would ever know what had become of him.

Or maybe he’d end up facing the noose after all, and the steps up to it. If he could picture himself walking without flinching to his execution, perhaps he could actually do it.
He knew he ought to be focusing on what he would be saying to the Archivist if he was called, but at this moment, death seemed so close he could touch it, and besides, it was easier to accept failure than to dare to predict success. He’d never been especially superstitious, but imagining triumph now seemed like drawing a target on his back. No reason to offend the Egyptian gods. Not so early.

He stood up and walked the cell. Cold, barren, with bars and a flat stone shelf that pretended at being a bed. A bare toilet that needed cleaning, and the sharp smell of it was starting to squirm against his skin.

If I had something to read . . . The thought crept in without warning, and he felt it like a personal loss. Not having a book at hand was a worse punishment than most. He was trying not to think about his death, and he was too afraid to think about the fate of Morgan or Scholar Wolfe or anything else . . . except that he could almost hear Scholar Wolfe’s dry, acerbic voice telling him, If only you had a brain up to the task, Brightwell, you’d never lack for something to read.

Jess settled on the stone ledge, closed his eyes, and tried to clearly imagine the first page of one of his favorite books. Nothing came at his command. Just words, jumbled and frantic, that wouldn’t sort themselves in order. Better if he imagined writing a letter.

Dear Morgan, he thought. I’m trapped in a holding cell inside the Serapeum, and all I can think of is that I should have done better by you, and all of us. I’m afraid all this is for nothing. And I’m sorry. I’m sorry for being stupid enough to think I could outwit the Archivist. I love you. Please don’t hate me.

That was selfish. She should hate him. He’d sent her back into the Iron Tower, a life sentence of servitude and an unbreakable collar fastened tight around her neck. He’d deceived Scholar Wolfe into a prison far worse than this one, and an inevitable death sentence. He’d betrayed everyone who’d ever trusted him, and for what?

For cleverness and a probably foolish idea that he could somehow, somehow, pull off a miracle. What gave him the right to even think it?

Clank.

That was the sound of a key turning in a heavy lock.

Jess stood, the chill on his back left by the ledge still lingering like a ghost, and then he came to the bars as the door at the end of the hall opened. He could see the hinges move and the iron door swinging in. It wasn’t locked again when it closed. Careless.
He listened to the decisive thud of footsteps against the floor, growing louder, and then three High Garda soldiers in black with golden emblems were in front of his cell. They stopped and faced him. The oldest—his close-cut hair a stiff silver brush around his head—barked in common Greek, “Step back from the bars and turn around.”

Jess’s skin felt flushed, then cold; he swallowed back a rush of fear and felt his pulse race in a futile attempt to outrun the inevitable. He followed the instructions. They didn’t lock the outer door. That’s a chance, if I can get by them. He could. He could sweep the legs out from under the first, use that off-balance body to knock back the other two, pull a sidearm free from one of them, shoot at least one, maybe two of them. Luck would dictate whether he’d die in the attempt, but at least he’d die fighting.

I don’t want to die, something in him that sounded like a child whispered. Not like Liam. Not on the same day.

And suddenly, he remembered.

The London sky, iron gray. Light rain had been falling on his child’s face. He’d been too short to see his brother ascend anything but the top two steps of the scaffold. Liam had stumbled on the last one, and a guard had steadied him. His brother had been shivering and slow, and he hadn’t been brave after all. He’d looked out into the crowd of those gathered, and Jess remembered the searing second of eye contact with his brother before Liam transferred that stare to their father.

Jess had looked, too. Callum Brightwell had stared back without a flicker of change in his expression, as if his eldest son was a stranger.

They’d tied Liam’s hands. And put a hood over his head.

A voice in the here and now snapped him out of the memory. “Against the wall. Hands behind your back.”

Jess slowly moved to comply, trying to assess where the other man was . . . and froze when the barrel of a gun pressed against the back of his neck. “I know what you’re thinking, son. Don’t try it. I’d rather not shoot you for stupidity.”

The guard had a familiar accent—raised near Manchester, most likely. His time in Alexandria had covered his English roots a bit, but it was odd, Jess thought, that he might be killed by one of his countrymen, so far from home. Killed by the English, just like Liam.
Once a set of Library restraints settled around his wrists and tightened, he felt strangely less shaken. Opportunity was gone now. All his choices had been narrowed to one course. All he had to do now was play it out.

Jess turned to look at the High Garda soldier. A man with roots from another garden, maybe one closer to Alexandria; the man had a darker complexion, dark eyes, a neat beard, and a compassionate but firm expression on his face. “Am I coming back?” he asked, and wished he hadn’t.

“Likely not,” the soldier said. “Wherever you go next, you won’t be back here.”

Jess nodded. He closed his eyes for a second and then opened them. Liam had faltered on the stairs. Had trembled. But at the end his elder brother had stood firm in his bonds and hood and waited for death without showing any fear.

He could do the same.

“Then, let’s go,” he said, and forced a grin he hoped looked careless. “I could do with a change of scenery.”




One winner will receive this Great Library prize pack including:

Signed hardcover copy of Ink and Bone (Book 1)
Signed hardcover copy of Paper and Fire (Book 2)
Signed hardcover copy of Ash and Quill (Book 3)
Advance copy of Smoke and Iron (Book 4)
"Old Books" handmade candle
Handmade notebook
Hieroglyphic wax seal and wax
Antique statue of Pericles (for Classical inspiration)
Book keepsake box

Thirty runner-ups will receive a copy of INK AND BONE. 

All post information and giveaway provided by the publisher. 

May 29, 2018

The Great American Read Blog Tour for Dover Books +GIVEAWAY #greatreadgiveaway


Very excited today to be a part of the Great American Read blog tour hosted by The Children's Book Review!


Dover is partnering with PBS for the Great American ReadAmerica’s Most-Loved Novels.

Hosted by Meredith Vieira, PBS’s 8-episode documentary, The Great American Read, celebrates America’s 100 most-loved novels — and Dover Books publishes a wide variety of these essential works as Thrift Editions, Evergreen Classics, deluxe hardcover Calla Editions™, and other affordable formats for readers of all ages.

As an English teacher and major, I was super excited to be able to share this with you!

Enter For A Chance To Win A Set Of 7 Titles From The Great American Read List, As Well As The Five Great English Novels Boxed Set!


Two (2) grand prize winners receive:

A set of 7 titles from The Great American Read list:
Alice in Wonderland, by Lewis Carroll
Anne of Green Gables, by L. M. Montgomery
Little Women, by Louisa May Alcott
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, by Mark Twain
The Call of the Wild, by Jack London
The Story of Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley
Adventures of Don Quixote, by Argentina Palacio

A Five Great English Novels Boxed Set:
Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austen
Great Expectations, by Charles Dickens
Wuthering Heights, by Emily Brontë
Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley
The Heart of Darkness, by Joseph Conrad

Value: $51+

Three (3) runner-up winners receive:

A set of 7 titles from The Great American Read list (as above)
Value: $33+


a Rafflecopter giveaway

About The Books


Alice in WonderlandAlice In Wonderland
Written by Lewis Carroll

Publisher’s Synopsis: One adventure follows another in this delightful tale as Alice changes size unexpectedly, attends a tea party given by the March Hare, visits a garden of talking flowers, and acts as witness at the trial of a thief who has stolen some tarts. Along the way, she meets such unforgettable characters as the Mad Hatter, the grinning Cheshire Cat, the tearful Mock Turtle, the hookah-smoking Caterpillar, the autocratic Red Queen, and other fanciful folk.

Alice in Wonderland is one of the world’s most-beloved works of fiction, charming children and adults alike with Alice’s adventures and Carroll’s audacious puns and wordplay — but at the same time it is a clever satire, lampooning Victorian education, literature, and politics. Now this enchanting fantasy, enhanced with all 42 original illustrations by John Tenniel, is ready to charm readers of all ages in this unabridged Evergreen Classics edition.

Anne of Green GablesAnne Of Green Gables
Written by L. M. Montgomery

Publisher’s Synopsis: Life is forever changed at Green Gables, a tranquil farm on Canada’s Prince Edward Island, with the arrival of a redheaded chatterbox named Anne. The spirited, precocious 11-year-old orphan finds “scope for imagination” everywhere she looks, transforming the lives of Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert, her elderly guardians, with her merry doings and misadventures. Anne — spelled with an “e,” as she gravely informs new acquaintances — builds a world of enchantment around Green Gables and its surrounding woodlands, lakes, and valleys. Thanks to the freckle-faced girl’s imaginative musings, the rustic region’s natural wonders blossom into a fairyland of endless romance. Anne’s inspired prattle, goodwill, and joie de vivre win her a warm circle of friends, just as they have won the hearts of readers around the world.

Since its first appearance in 1908, the novel has led generations of children to laugh and cry — but mostly laugh — along with this beloved story’s vivacious heroine. Now this inexpensive edition, complete and unabridged, introduces new readers to the ageless charm of a fanciful world made real by love and friendship. The inspiration for 2016 PBS movie and the 2017 CBC/Netflix Anne mini-series.

Reprint of a standard edition.

Little WomenLittle Women
Written by Louisa May Alcott

Publisher’s Synopsis: This American classic is as fresh and meaningful today as it was when it was first written in the 19th century. Largely based on the author’s own childhood, Little Women is a timeless tale of the four young March sisters — Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy — who grow to maturity in their mother’s tender but strong care. As different in their personalities as they are alike in their devotion to each other, the girls vow to support their beloved mother, Marmee, by behaving their best while Father is away, serving as an army chaplain in the Civil War.
Literary-minded tomboy Jo develops a fast friendship with the boy next door, and pretty Meg, the eldest, finds romance; frail and affectionate Beth fills the house with music, and little Amy, the youngest, seeks beauty with all the longing of an artist’s soul. Although poor in material wealth, the family possesses an abundance of love, friendship, and imaginative gifts that captivate readers time and again.
This inexpensive, complete and unabridged edition of this beloved novel is sure to delight a generation of new readers, as well as those reacquainting themselves with its warmth and charm.

Reprint of a standard edition. This classic was the inspiration for the May 2018 PBS three-part adaptation.

The Adventures of Tom SawyerThe Adventures Of Tom Sawyer
Written by Mark Twain

Publisher’s Synopsis: Like most boys, Tom Sawyer would rather play hooky than go to school. But Tom’s lively imagination and thirst for adventure lead him into the most extraordinary situations, from a search for buried treasure to the accidental witness of a murder in a graveyard. All of his exploits — tricking his pals into whitewashing a fence, sharing his medicine with the family cat, disrupting a church service with a pinching insect — are flavored with the humor for which his creator, Mark Twain, is justly famed.
In writing this great American classic, Twain drew upon his own memories of life in a small Missouri town before the Civil War. Since the book’s 1876 publication, generations of readers of all ages have laughed at Tom’s hijinks and taken him into their hearts, along with Huckleberry Finn, Becky Thatcher, Aunt Polly, and other memorable characters. This new Dover Evergreen Classics edition offers a fresh introduction to the lovable scamp and the enduring joys of his escapades.

Reprint of a standard edition.

The Call of the WildThe Call Of The Wild
Written by Jack London

Publisher’s Synopsis: This triumphant tale of survival, the greatest of Jack London’s works, relates the adventures of Buck, half-St. Bernard and half-Scottish sheepdog, who is forced into the brutal life of a sled-dog during the heady days of the Alaska gold rush.
Set in the harsh and unforgiving environment of the Far North, the story follows Buck as he grows daily in strength, savagery, and cunning, adapting to his hostile circumstances by responding to the stirring of his primitive ancestral traits. This unabridged edition offers young readers a fine introduction to the excitement of the classic adventure novel.

Reprint of the Macmillan Company, New York, 1903 edition.

The Story Of Frankenstein
Written by Mary Shelley

Publisher’s Synopsis: With his debut nearly two centuries ago, Dr. Frankenstein’s monster captured the popular imagination and never let go, haunting even those who have never read this classic of horror fiction. This specially adapted children’s edition retains all of the excitement of the original version yet makes the enduring Gothic fable accessible to youngsters.

The brilliant scientist Dr. Victor Frankenstein indulges his curiosity about the hidden laws of nature when he happens upon the secret to the animation of lifeless matter. Piecing together the detritus of butcher shops and dissecting rooms, the doctor fashions an eight-foot-tall creature whose loathsome appearance fills even his creator with repulsion. Abandoned by his maker, rejected with fear and disgust by everyone he encounters, the enraged and embittered monster goes on a murderous rampage, determined to destroy Frankenstein by striking at those closest to him.

Since its 1817 publication, this incredible and imaginative fantasy has held generations of readers spellbound. This new, specially abridged edition, enhanced with illustrations by Thea Kliros, will satisfy young readers’ appetites for gripping suspense and ghoulish thrills.

Original abridgment of a standard edition.

Adventures of Don QuixoteAdventures Of Don Quixote
Written by Argentina Palacio

Publisher’s Synopsis: “Once, there was a man who went crazy from too much reading. He only read books about knighthood; that was the problem.” So begins this charming retelling of Don Quixote de la Mancha, one of the most entertaining books ever written. Young people will delight in the hilarious adventures of the idealistic would-be knight and his “squire,” Sancho Panza, as they set out to right the wrongs of the world. Ms. Palacios, a talented storyteller, captures all the flavor and irony of the original as the two heroes ride forth to conquer evil. Along the way the well-meaning but addled knight-errand mistakes a miserable inn and its keeper for a castle and its lord; imagines an ordinary peasant girl to be the noble lady Dulcinea, perceives windmills as giants to be overcome, and gets enmeshed in other cases of mistaken identity. These, and many more incidents and adventures are retold here in a beguiling, easy-to-read version, enhanced by six new black-and-white illustrations by Thea Kliros. This edition is sure to delight today’s youngsters, just as the original has enchanted countless readers since its publication nearly 400 years ago.

Reprint of The Knight and the Squire, Doubleday & Company, Inc., Garden City, New York, 1979.

5 Great English Novels Boxed SetFive Great English Novels Boxed Set


Publisher’s Synopsis: Five volumes of landmark fiction by noted English authors include Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Joseph Conrad’s The Heart of Darkness, Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, Charles Dickens’s Great Expectations, and Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights. Housed in an attractive slipcase, each of these classic tales is presented complete and unabridged.

Dover Original.


Per FTC guidelines, post information and giveaway provided by The Children’s Book Review and Dover Books.